1. (via Better search in mainland China - Inside Search)…  ”In order to avoid connection problems, users can refine their searches without the problem keywords. For example, instead of searching for [长江], they could search for [changjiang]—which also means Yangtze River, but is written using pinyin, the system used to transliterate Chinese characters into Latin script. This won’t cause a timeout, but will still generate search results related to the Yangtze River.”

    (via Better search in mainland China - Inside Search)…  ”In order to avoid connection problems, users can refine their searches without the problem keywords. For example, instead of searching for [长], they could search for [changjiang]—which also means Yangtze River, but is written using pinyin, the system used to transliterate Chinese characters into Latin script. This won’t cause a timeout, but will still generate search results related to the Yangtze River.”

     
  2. One thing that struck me as odd was the absence of a discussion around information quality. We face attacks that are as much about flooding the Internet with information as well as attacks that are about restricting the Internet. These different problems seem to require somewhat different approaches. I think it would make sense to discuss internet freedom and information quality at some stage, but I did not see too much of that. I.e. tools of freedom can easily be turned to tools for propaganda. And that is a hard problem. Just imagine trying to build a propagande detection algorithm
     
  3. Computer hackers plan to take the internet beyond the reach of censors by putting their own communication satellites into orbit.

    The scheme was outlined at the Chaos Communication Congress in Berlin.

    The project’s organisers said the Hackerspace Global Grid will also involve developing a grid of ground stations to track and communicate with the satellites.

     
  4. Part of the job of responsible corporate management in the 21st century is doing human rights due diligence on new markets, instituting internal review procedures, identifying principles by which decisions are to be made in tough situations, because we cannot let the short-term gains that all of us think are legitimate and worth seeking jeopardize the openness of the internet and human rights of individuals who use it without it coming back to haunt us all in the future. Because a free and open internet is important not just to technology companies but to all companies.
     
  5. when ideas are blocked, information deleted, conversations stifled, and people constrained in their choices, the internet is diminished for all of us. What we do today to preserve fundamental freedoms online will have a profound effect on the next generation of users
     
  6. India is trying to work with some of the Internet’s biggest names — including Facebook, Google and others — as it looks to screen and, in some cases, censor unsuitable comment before it is published online.

    Authorities in Thailand recently warned the country’s Facebook users that sharing, and even liking, content that defames the country’s royal family could result in prosecution and jail. Like India, the Thai government has contacted Facebook for help in removing ‘harmful’ content from the social network.

    The government in South Korea has recently established laws to to crack down on offensiveness and immoral content on mobile and the Internet in the country.

     
  7. Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-American journalist… was arrested at the Ministry of the Interior in Cairo on Wednesday. She was beaten and assaulted by police, interrogated by military intelligence and finally freed 12 hours later.

    She borrowed the Blackberry of another protester arrested and detained with her to tweet, “Beaten arrested in interior ministry.”

    Between the time she was arrested and the time she was released (tweeting, “I AM FREE”), the hashtag #freemona had become a worldwide trending topic, sparked, in part, by New York Times columnist Nick Kristof. In fact, it only took 20 minutes to trend.

    The State Department responded on their Twitter account, saying, “Reports of @monaeltahawy and @pangeaworld detention very concerning. @USEmbassyCairo engaging authorities.”

     
  8. Secure and reliable access to the Internet and technologies is essential to creating jobs and economic growth in the 21st century economy," the council’s Vice President Jake Colvin said in a statement.
    Putting the problem into context, he said, “Trade rules were written to ship widgets rather than bytes.”…
    Vice President Joe Biden, speaking Nov.1 at the London Conference on Cyberspace, touched on the problem,…
    “Those countries that try to have it both ways by making the Internet closed to free expression but open for business will find that this is no easy task,” he said. “They may try to build walls between these different activities, but there isn’t a separate economic Internet, political Internet and social Internet. They are all one. It’s simply the Internet.
     
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  10. Almost 2,900 spoken tweets had been posted as of Friday afternoon on the Twitter account (at)speak2tweet. Some of the heaviest volume came after access to both Twitter and the Internet was restored in Egypt earlier this week. The alternative method of tweeting has turned into a forum for longer-form expression because the voice recordings aren’t confined to Twitter’s 140-character limit.

    Another Twitter account, (at)AliveInEgypt, has been set up to transcribe the messages, which are mostly in Arabic, into text. An Internet radio station also is playing the voice recordings at http://egypt.periszkopradio.hu.