1. a 3D model of the Giza Necropolis, a free application available to all Internet users, which was unveiled Tuesday at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts.

    This digital model is the only way we can see Giza in its ancient splendor, due to looting, erosion, urban sprawl and artifacts being sent across the world.

     
  2. The Big Internet Museum has launched with the aim of taking that mantle.

    Dividing into numerous ‘wings’, such as Audio-Visual, Social Media and Gaming, the museum site lets you navigate through ‘exhibits’ from the history of online life, from Arpanet and Usenet to YouTube and Instagram. A special will be filled with temporary exhibitions from time to time. If there’s something you think is missing, you can submit ideas for future exhibits.

     
  3. A former recreational bodybuilder from Bulgaria, Ms. Popova is the unlikely founder of the exploding online emporium of ideas known as Brain Pickings…. Her paternal grandmother was a rabid biblio and had a collection of encyclopedias, Ms. Popova said, and she credits the act of randomly opening volumes and happening upon entries for her passion to discover old knowledge. “The Web has such a presentism bias,” she said, with Facebook updates, tweets and blog entries always appearing with the latest first. By contrast, flipping through the encyclopedia was “an interesting model of learning about the world serendipitously and also guidedely.”
     
  4. For example, the Getty has a new youth-oriented application for smartphones through a game it calls Switch, in which an evil genie has wreaked havoc at the museum. The paintings in an app are not the exact duplicates of the paintings on the wall, so players must find the differences. The challenge is to correct details in a copy of the museum painting on the iPhone so that it matches the actual image. In the first test, there were a series of details including the absence of a brooch in an oil painting of Leonilla, Princess of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn, by Franz Xaver Winterhalter. The player has to figure out and correct what is inaccurate.
     
  5. The Martin Agency and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library have teamed up to create Clouds Over Cuba, an interactive documentary that retraces the steps of the United States during the Cuban Missile Crisis, as the event nears its 50th anniversary. The two-hour film includes a collection of photos, footage, and speeches of President Kennedy and others involved in the 1962 event. During the film, a dossier will populate with multimedia items that can be accessed later through the web or from a mobile device. Clouds Over Cuba also includes the ability to sync to iCal or Google Calendar so that viewers can relive the days leading up to the crisis in virtual realtime.
     
  6. Nearly a million documents that make up Winston Churchill’s archive, ranging from school reports, drafts of his famous wartime speeches, to cigar bills, have been made instantly accessible to students, historians, and even politicians looking for lessons from past coalition governments… The digital archive, which can be accessed remotely, is published by Bloomsbury. The annual subscription for universities and libraries and other institutions starts at £1,120 for a small college rising to several thousand pounds depending on the size of the organisation
    — Winston Churchill archive made available online | UK news | guardian.co.uk. (this is disappointing. I’m glad it is digitised to preserve, but sad because the price means it is not accessible unless you’re rich or have access to a university library)
     
  7. 00:16 12th Oct 2012

    Notes: 614

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    Tags: Culturemapping

    image: Download

    theatlantic:

Turning Street View Into Street Art

As Google’s Street View cars rumble through our cities and towns, they don’t capture merely the geography of our streets and buildings. They see and record the life there, people going about their days.
Those inadvertent portraits are now moving back from the digital realm to our earthly one, in artist Paolo Cirio’s projectStreet Ghosts.
Cirio finds images of humans on the streets of Street View and creates life-sized prints of them, and places them back on the spot where they were originally captured, such as in the picture above, taken from a Street View image of Dircksenstrasse in Berlin.”

Read more. 

    theatlantic:

    Turning Street View Into Street Art

    As Google’s Street View cars rumble through our cities and towns, they don’t capture merely the geography of our streets and buildings. They see and record the life there, people going about their days.

    Those inadvertent portraits are now moving back from the digital realm to our earthly one, in artist Paolo Cirio’s projectStreet Ghosts.

    Cirio finds images of humans on the streets of Street View and creates life-sized prints of them, and places them back on the spot where they were originally captured, such as in the picture above, taken from a Street View image of Dircksenstrasse in Berlin.”

    Read more. 

     
  8. (Art.sy) aims to do for visual art what Pandora did for music and Netflix for film: become a source of discovery, pleasure and education. With 275 galleries and 50 museums and institutions as partners, Art.sy has already digitized 20,000 images into its reference system, which it calls the Art Genome Project. But as it extends the platform’s reach, Art.sy also raises questions about how (or if) digital analytics should be applied to visual art. Can algorithms help explain art?
     
  9. modern ways in which art is created, produced, distributed, marketed, preserved and supported have shifted as a direct reaction of the world’s transition to a socially connected, digital society - to the age of the internet.

    Traditionally, artists have been going to a gallery with their portfolio, and the gallery decides whether the work is good enough to expose.

    Now, they turn to the web - to exhibit their work and to sell it, too.

    With new services such as crowdfunding, for the first time artists are able to raise money online to pursue their ideas

     
  10. They looked at some one million tweets from six historical events over the past three years (Iranian elections, Michael Jackson’s death, the H1N1 outbreak, Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize, the Egyptian revolution, and the recent Syrian uprising) and found that archiving is not keeping apace with the web’s fast turnover — as time progressed, the webpages linked to became increasingly unavailable. “We estimate that after a year from publishing about 11 percent of content shared in social media will be gone
     
  11. Almost 30 per cent of recorded history, shared over social media such as Twitter, has disapeared, according to a new study of the Egyptian uprising and other significant events
     
  12. Europe’s digital library Europeana has been described as the ‘jewel in the crown’ of the sprawling web estate of EU institutions. It aggregates digitised books, paintings, photographs, recordings and films from over 2,200 contributing cultural heritage organisations across Europe - including major national bodies such as the British Library, the Louvre and the Rijksmuseum. Today Europeana is opening up data about all 20 million of the items it holds under the CC0 rights waiver. This means that anyone can reuse the data for any purpose - whether using it to build applications to bring cultural content to new audiences in new ways, or analysing it to improve our understanding of Europe’s cultural and intellectual history.
     
  13. the way to protect books is you hold them close, and the way you protect digital data is you give it away
     
  14. The team is working within the stone walls of the Sacred and Imperial Monastery of the God-Trodden Mount of Sinai — St. Catherine’s for short. For 17 centuries, the Greek Orthodox Christian monks here have protected an unparalleled trove of manuscripts. Now the monastery is in a multimillion-dollar push to physically and digitally protect its treasures and make them easily accessible, in most cases for the first time, to scholars around the world. In the process, the monks will establish a model for the preservation of irreplaceable ancient manuscripts in a world where more and more of them are threatened by the chaos of war and revolution.
     
  15. Visual data mining of Google Streetview images to determine the unique architectural “style” of a city bit.ly/N0fmNe’s-unique-style/
    — Twitter