1. today’s Web is dominated by sites such as Facebook and Twitter, where people maintain personal, egocentric feeds. Outside specific settings like massive multiplayer games, relatively few people mingle in shared virtual space. Instead, they use mobile devices that are unsuited to complex creative work and favor neatly self-­contained apps over messier, interconnected Web pages. Shirky, who is an advisor to the Wikimedia Foundation, says people steeped in that model will struggle to understand how and why they should contribute to Wikipedia or any project like it. … Gardner agrees that today’s Web is hostile to self-organized collective efforts, likening it to a city that has lost its public parks. “Our time is spent on an increasingly small number of increasingly large corporate sites,” she says. “We need more public space online.”
     
  2. Today the English Wikipedia has 4.4 million articles; there are 23.1 million more in 286 other languages. But those tougher rules and the more suspicious atmosphere that came along with them had an unintended consequence. … The number of active editors on the English-language Wikipedia peaked in 2007 at more than 51,000 and has been declining ever since as the supply of new ones got choked off. This past summer only 31,000 people could be considered active editors
     
  3. For the first few years after its inception in 2001, Wikipedia was primarily
    dominated by articles in English. By 2010, only about 20% of Wikipedia articles were in English, while it was estimated that 27% of Internet users were English speakers
     
  4. ClueBot NG, as the bot is known, resides on a computer from which it sallies forth into the vast encyclopaedia to detect and clean up vandalism almost as soon as it occurs.  It is one of several hundred bots patrolling Wikipedia at any given time. Its role in repairing the Supreme Court article illustrates how bots have quietly become an indispensable - if virtually invisible - part of the Wikipedia project.

     
  5. Much of the success of Monmouthpedia comes from its ability to capture the imagination of the Wikipedia community, which has embraced the town virtually. Wikipedia volunteers have contributed nearly 500 new articles in over 25 languages, as well as videos on topics such as the historic Chartists movement.
    The project also has a long list of partners, including 200 businesses, several universities and nearly every school and community group in the area. Wikipedia has partnered with museums and other institutions before, as in Derby, but in Monmouth you will see over 1,000 QR codes on every school, every important building, and hundreds of shops. The County Council itself has a QRpedia code in its reception that takes you to their Wikipedia article.
     
  6. The definition of what makes someone an expert is changing. They search for expertise in Wikipedia’s pages, and they find it, but what they’re looking for — what they call expertise — uses different signals to project itself. Expertise, to these researchers, isn’t who a writer is but what a writer knows, as measured by what they read online.
     
  7. Anonymous authors. No editors. No special privileges for experts. Signs plastering articles detailing the ways they fall short. All the disagreements about each article posted in public. Easy access to all the previous drafts—including highlighting of the specific changes. No one who can certify that an article is done and ready. It would seem that Wikipedia does everything in its power to avoid being an authority, yet that seems only to increase its authority—a paradox that indicates an important change in the nature of authority
     
  8. image: Download

    journo-geekery:

The World Mapped According to Wikipedia Articles in 7 Different Languages - information aesthetics writing up work by Mapping Wikipedia [tracemedia.co.uk].
As IA says, “There is something strangely mesmerizing about maps with a lot of dots.”

    journo-geekery:

    The World Mapped According to Wikipedia Articles in 7 Different Languages - information aesthetics writing up work by Mapping Wikipedia [tracemedia.co.uk].

    As IA says, “There is something strangely mesmerizing about maps with a lot of dots.”

     
  9. (Wikipedia) is ranked fifth in the world, with 480 million visitors per month, over 21 million articles, and almost 1.5 million contributors since its inception. Wikipedia has 88,500 active contributors per month.
     
  10. While Norwegian is spoken by 4.6 million people, there are 300,000 articles on Wikipedia in the language. Finnish is spoken by 5 million people, and there are 273,000 articles on Wikipedia in the language.

    In comparison, there are only 154,000 articles in Arabic, despite the fact that there are roughly 374 million Arabic speakers, making it the fifth most commonly spoken language in the world. Wikipedia’s Arabic articles account for a measly 0.007% of its overall content.

     
  11. image: Download

    (via Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins) - cool graphic design, and funny too in a sad way (I’m a bit stunned you could be an internet user and not have heard about the blackout in advance, it was even in the newspapers here)

    (via Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins) - cool graphic design, and funny too in a sad way (I’m a bit stunned you could be an internet user and not have heard about the blackout in advance, it was even in the newspapers here)

     
  12. image: Download

    (via xkcd: Extended Mind) comic: “when wikipedia has an outage, my apparent IQ drops by about 30 points”

    (via xkcd: Extended Mind) comic: “when wikipedia has an outage, my apparent IQ drops by about 30 points”

     
  13. count of number of words / number of articles by language on Wikipedia

     
  14. Europe and North America are home to 84% of all (Wikipedia) articles. Anguilla has the fewest number of geotagged articles (four), and indeed most small island nations and city states have less than 100 articles. However, it is not just microstates that are characterised by extremely low levels of wiki representation. Almost all of Africa is poorly represented in the encyclopaedia. There are remarkably more Wikipedia articles (7,800) written about Antarctica than any country in Africa or South America. Even China, which is home to the world’s biggest population of Internet users and is the fourth largest country on Earth contains fewer than 1% of all geotagged articles.
     
  15. Arabic is the world’s fifth most spoken language and yet only has the 25th largest Wikipedia. There are just over 24,000 geotagged Arabic Wikipedia articles whilst there are over 691,000 geotagged articles in English.