1. (via Google exec says web is ‘scarce resource’ | Video | Reuters.com) — hopefully full speech video will come soon, but in the meantime, I found this

     
  2. image: Download

    journo-geekery:

The World Mapped According to Wikipedia Articles in 7 Different Languages - information aesthetics writing up work by Mapping Wikipedia [tracemedia.co.uk].
As IA says, “There is something strangely mesmerizing about maps with a lot of dots.”

    journo-geekery:

    The World Mapped According to Wikipedia Articles in 7 Different Languages - information aesthetics writing up work by Mapping Wikipedia [tracemedia.co.uk].

    As IA says, “There is something strangely mesmerizing about maps with a lot of dots.”

     
  3. Virtually every U.S. household with an annual income over $75,000 is online, but that’s only true for 63% of adults who live in a household with an annual income under $30,000. The numbers look quite similar for different education levels: 94% of adults with post-graduate degrees are online, but 57% of those without high school diplomas remain offline.
     
  4. While Norwegian is spoken by 4.6 million people, there are 300,000 articles on Wikipedia in the language. Finnish is spoken by 5 million people, and there are 273,000 articles on Wikipedia in the language.

    In comparison, there are only 154,000 articles in Arabic, despite the fact that there are roughly 374 million Arabic speakers, making it the fifth most commonly spoken language in the world. Wikipedia’s Arabic articles account for a measly 0.007% of its overall content.

     
  5. image: Download

    (via Confirmed: The Internet Does Not Solve Global Inequality - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic)
     
  6. “Virtually all young people are familiar with electronic games and social networking and might be considered as ‘digital natives’, but they are not “digitally competent” in the sense that they do not know sufficiently how to use the digital world in a business context,” said the EC.

    The European e-Skills Week will comprise a number of activities and events designed to inform young people on how to acquire such skills from between the 19 and 30 March. The EC says that the driving force behind the initiative was the importance of ICT skills to the future of the European economy and an increase in jobs which require a high level of education.

     
  7. Schmidt promoted the idea of a stepping stone as the world figures out how to connect the very poor to the Internet. He said that “mesh networks” — small groups of devices connected to one another but not the Internet — are a way to at least get remote communities together. Mesh networks can serve as a kind of “digital watering hole,” where small communities can work out important issues.
    “No one is saying technology will suddenly change the world’s social structure, but connectivity changes lives
     
  8.  
  9. 00:20 18th Feb 2012

    Notes: 119

    Reblogged from ayjay

    Tags: educationdigital divide

    saying kids are digital natives because they can text, send email, and use facebook… is like claiming that kids these days are all automotive engineers because they have driver’s licenses.

    I teach freshmen. Most of them have the barest idea of how to use the Internet except for simple, pre-packaged tasks

     
  10. Codecademy’s “Code Summer+” will teach the basics of programming online as an abbreviated version of its popular Code Year program. This effort aims to train thousands of low-income youths to build innovative online apps
     
  11. Robert Scoble tweeted that “only about 30% of Davos attendees are on Twitter.”
     
  12. It’s daunting, actually, to think about how hard I would have to work, and how much I would have to learn, and how many silently-and-inexplicably-failing scripts I would have to write, before I could produce code that would rival what the professionals write and put on the internet gratis.

    I just can’t resist all the free goodies. If knowing how to program is tomorrow’s “basic literacy,” I afraid I’m just going to have to die as an illiterate code plagiarist.

     
  13. every year about 200 million people are going online for the very first time.

    However, traditional internet access via a copper wire and a desktop PC will fade into the background.

    The rapid fall in the cost of smartphones - with cheap versions now costing about $100 - means that by 2016 about 80% of all internet users will access the web using a mobile phone.

     
  14. The majority of Facebook and Twitter audiences are over 40-years-old,” says Gerzema. “You’re dealing with people who have worked in and around computing for 30 years – 15 of them online – and who are completely at ease with technological innovation. It’s no longer safe to try and demark the early adopter demographic by age alone.
     
  15. The world’s congested mobile airwaves are being divided in a lopsided manner, with 1 percent of consumers generating half of all traffic. The top 10 percent of users, meanwhile, are consuming 90 percent